Decoding Cheon Stamps: Unveiling a Stamp Editions Myth

In the fascinating realm of philately, the classification and study of stamps often reveal intriguing insights into history, culture, and even the nuances of artistic expression. A striking example of this is presented in an enlightening article titled “The truth about the classification of ‘Cheon’ handwriting surcharge stamp plates” by Oh Byeong-yoon, published on December […]

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Japanese era postcard showing statistics with a twist

The postcard presented here is a significant historical artifact that encapsulates a critical period in Korea’s history under Japanese colonial rule. The intricate design of the postcard, adorned with a traditional Korean structure and overlaid with statistical graphs, belies the grim narrative that the data represents—a narrative of a population under the strain of foreign […]

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Is this a good chance to add these dream items to your collection?

In the world of stamp collecting, the interest in historical stamps is clear, particularly those from Korea that date back to 1884. This article looks at Korea’s first issued 5 and 10 mun stamps, highlighting the controversies and questions over the authenticity of cancellations on these stamps by describing a few items from recent auctions.

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Debunking Myths: The Reality of ‘Taegeuk’ Stamps Editions

In the world of philately, the distinction between different editions of stamps can be a matter of intense debate and interest. A prime example of this is found within the Korean stamp collecting community, particularly regarding the ‘Taegeuk’ stamps and the ‘Cheon’ surcharged series stamps. Traditionally, these stamps have been categorized into first and reprint […]

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Postal and communications routes in Korea (1913)

Maps play an indispensable role in philatelic research, offering a unique lens through which to explore the intricate tapestry of history and geography that stamps represent. As miniature canvases of cultural and political narratives, stamps are more than just a means of postage; they are a reflection of the changing landscapes, borders, and identities of […]

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The Historic Significance of a Postal Cover from 1895

In a fascinating glimpse into the postal history of the late 19th century, a cover adorned with a unique combination of stamps provides a snapshot of the era’s postal practices. This particular cover, totaling 40 poon in postage, is comprised of stamps in denominations of 5, 10, and 25 poon. This combination precisely met the […]

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Postal stations and mapae as a means of communication before the implementation of modern postal services

Korea’s official postal system was established around 487 AD. The purpose of this system was for the central government to issue orders to local government offices. This is called the postal station system.

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Old Korean newspapers with 1900 cancellations on 1 poon surcharged stamps

The Korea post office ordered an ordinance to use 1 poon stamp for mailing newspapers in 1900. Yet there were no stamps with a 1 poon value, so the post office surcharged 1 poon on the existing 1895 Tae-Guk stamps and let them be used until the new 1 poon stamps will be published. Those […]

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A Postcard used in 1945, the last year of Japanese occupation of Korea

Forward Note by Bob Finder: The following article by one of our members of the Korea Stamp Society (KSS) shows one of the key values of being a member of the KSS; that value is the gaining of new information about Korean philately from other members. With the collaboration of six different members of the […]

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Obtaining one more 1905 Postal Envelope of the Missionary Mr. H. G. Underwood!

This year I was lucky enough to have bid on an auction and won this 1905 postal envelope of Missionary Horace Grant Underwood. The sender’s address is “FROM: H. G. UNDERWOOD,SEOUL, KOREA.”, receiver address is typed as “Tiffin Stamp Co, 160 N St. Tiffin Ohio, USA”. The envelope was franked with a 10 cent Eagle […]

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Story of Baron G. de Gunzburg – Russian Government Official in Chosen

(On the relationship Between Chosŏn and Russia) On October 8, 1895, Queen Myung-Sung was assassinated by the Japanese force. King Go-Jong, who was also confined at the palace Kyung-Bok, fearing for his life, wanted to escape. On November 28, 1895, the King’s first try to flee to the legation of the United States failed because […]

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The Story of Monsieur Charles Aleveque

Charles Aleveque (known in Korea as An Ryebaek, -晏禮百) made and distributed the first photographic postcards in Korea, published a French-Korean dictionary, and represented the Korean Government at the 1900 Paris Exposition. As a representative for a French trading company, he worked for trade between Korea and France, importing modern materials for the government of […]

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The Story of Monsieur Tremoulet

Following the opening of Korea’s ports to international commerce in the 1880s, the Government recognized the importance of developing modern methods of mining. On September 4, 1900, the ‘Governmental Mining School’ to promote industrial education was established. The officials of the school were to be the principal, a superintendent, four trainers, an assistant trainer, and […]

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Lee Neung-hwa, an unknown historical figure and a stamp collector in a time of turmoil

In Joseon (Korea) in the 33rd year (1896) of King Gojong‘s rule a French person, Emile Martel (1874-1949), established the French Language School in Seoul as a governmental institute in Jong-ro-gu, now known as Susong-dong (Korean: 수송동). Martel arrived in Korea in July 1894 at the age of only twenty years old. Subsequently this school […]

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Beautiful Postal Cards and Postal Covers of Early Korea

Some of the rarest examples of postal history of Empire Korea, combining the images of early 20th century Korea on hand-tinted postal cards and a cover demonstrating all the stamps available at the Chemulpo, Korea post office on a single day are that of a correspondence addressed to Mrs. Charlotte K. Ober, University of Washington, […]

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Entires with “TAEGEUK” of the 1st and 2nd Issued Sets

The Gab-sin coup d’etat (甲申政變; 갑신정변) of 4 December 1884 (Lunar calendar 10. 17.), attempted by the reformers at the opening ceremony of the post office, failed. All main figures were killed including Mr. Young-Sik Hong whose constant efforts had led to the issuing of a Royal decree to establish the Department of Post Office […]

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