Reader’s Question: History of Travelling Post Offices in Korea?

  Does anybody know more about the history of Travelling Post Offices (우편열차) in Korea? What I have found so far comes from two pictures showing two boards from the Stamp Museum in Cheonan (not Seoul) from an exhibit on TPO’s in Korea. This board lists for instance that the first mail transported by train […]

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Korea’s First Post Office Cancel – Don’t Be Misled!

In the summer of 1964 I received the following letter from a French gentleman: “Enclosed is $3000.00 plus in Korea No. l’s and 2’s in singles, pairs and combinations. All stamps are tied on piece and with the exception of one or two stamps the condition is very fine or superb. As I do not […]

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The special registration stamp and envelope (1961)

The special registration envelope and stamp illustrated here are used to mail currency and valuables within Korea only. The white envelope, 5″ x 9″ has an inner envelope made of paper of the same type used to cover doors and windows. Money, bonds, jewelry, and other valuables can be mailed in this. Money is not […]

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Korean Eisenhower Material (1969): Part 1

The death of former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) has meant a surge of interest in Eisenhower related philatelic material. There is an active “American President’s Unit” of the American Topical Association ably handed by Mr. Lauren R. Junez of Plymouth, Michigan. In a recent bulletin of the President’s […]

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Korea’s Postal and Communications System (1941)

(This text was originally published in 1941 and republished in KP XI No. 1 (February 1962). It is here being published again for its historical significance.) Only scant remainders enable us today to retrace the origins of the Korean Postal and Communications System. We do know for a fact, however, that the country’s rulers have […]

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Reader’s Question: American Banknote Co Package #4137 dated Nov 3 1944

(Reader’s question) Thought this item of collateral material might be of interest – “American Banknote Co Package #4137 dated Nov 3 1944”. It appears to have contained 100 sheets. The note that came with it said “Korea Occupied Nations Stamp”. Can anyone provide additional info?

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The 1951 provisional inflationary surcharge issues of Korea (1961): Part 4

(Part 4 of 4) The 1951 provisional Korean stamps were issued with overprinted inflationary denominations of 100, 200, and 300 won on the basic stamps whose values range from 4 to 100 won. These overprinted stamps afford not only an exciting challenge to the casual collector, but also an excellent opportunity for specialization by the […]

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Korean Philately Index to Volumes (1951-1972)

During the 1960s and early 1970s several times an index to Korean Philately magazine was published by members of the KSS. The series started in April 1963 when Harry Anderson issued the “Index to Volumes I-X (1951-1961)” as “Supplement #1 to Korean Philately”. After a second version was published by Harry Anderson in February 1976, […]

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Reader’s Question: Marks on reverse on 6 cheon Plum Blossom stamp?

I was looking for Plum Blossom stamps on cover on eBay for an article that is being written for the American Philatelic Society’s magazine, when I noticed one of the blue 6 ch in a short set that did not look quite right. This 6 ch was light blue, and casually looking at the image, […]

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The 1951 provisional inflationary surcharge issues of Korea (1961): Part 3

(Part 3 of 4) The 1951 provisional Korean stamps were issued with overprinted inflationary denominations of 100, 200, and 300 won on the basic stamps whose values range from 4 to 100 won. These overprinted stamps afford not only an exciting challenge to the casual collector, but also an excellent opportunity for specialization by the […]

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Original design – Airmail issue of 1952 (1965)

(Translated by Warren Hahn from “Korean Stamps” July 1965) The original design of the airmail issue of 1952 (Scott #C6-8) consisted of a plane flying over the National Capitol Building in Seoul. However, when the Korean War necessitated the evacuation of Seoul, and the transfer of the seat of government to Pusan, the design was […]

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