Old Korean newspapers with 1900 cancellations on 1 poon surcharged stamps

The Korea post office ordered an ordinance to use 1 poon stamp for mailing newspapers in 1900. Yet there were no stamps with a 1 poon value, so the post office surcharged 1 poon on the existing 1895 Tae-Guk stamps and let them be used until the new 1 poon stamps will be published. Those […]

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Booklet of North Korean Stamps from the Period before the Siege of Pyongyang

What a wonderful feeling to find something new, a philatelic treasure, a real “philagem”. And how wonderful to be able to add a stamp to your collection of which only 2 copies exist, or add both! A wonderful philatelic discovery, from a troubled era, from the philately of a closed country! The feeling when we […]

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The year in stamps: 1949 “Shooting across the border”

As South Korea entered 1949, the country was still grappling with the aftermath of World War II and the ongoing tensions between North and South Korea. While political and military developments dominated the headlines, the daily lives of ordinary citizens also continued to be shaped by the challenges of the time.

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Some Chollima Images on North Korea’s “Allies” Stamps

North Korea isn’t the only country that has used the chollima images on their postage stamps. Some of North Korea’s allies have used the image too. For example, from an image we have seen before on the Korea Stamps Society’s webpage is a East Germany pair with a semi-postal stamp of 20 +5 pf value […]

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The year in stamps: 1948 “The fighting starts”

The year 1948 was a tumultuous time in South Korea, marked by political turmoil, economic struggles, and social unrest. Despite these challenges, the country was poised for change, as it worked to establish a stable government and lay the foundation for a prosperous future. One of the key political developments of 1948 was the establishment […]

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The year in stamps: 1947 “Edging towards war”

In the year 1947, the relationship between North and South Korea was fraught with tension and uncertainty. The two countries had been divided since the end of World War II, and efforts to reunify the peninsula had been met with resistance and hostility from both sides. At the same time South Korea was a nation […]

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The Number of Chollimas on Stamps Grows and Grows!—Part 2

We continue the story of the Chollimas on North Korea stamps with an additional 16 different stamps depicting a Chollima, somewhere within the stamp’s design, including descriptions. The stamps described in Part 2 cover the stamps issued by North Korea showing the Chollima from the year of 1965 to the end of 1969.

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The year in stamps: 1946 “Korea divided”

During the closing year of WWII, a plan of establishing a four power trusteeship between the USA, the Soviet Union, China and the UK to rule Korea had been discussed between President Roosevelt and Marshal Stalin at Yalta in February 1945. This plan was supposed to eventually result in a united and independent Korea after […]

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Continuation of the Article on the South Korea Early Postcards of 1946 through 1953

An article on the basic introduction of the use of Japanese postcards through 1946 by South Korea, ended with the issuance of the South Korea’s first own design of a postcard with the unissued 1946 “Liberation” postcard , Korean Postage Stamp Catalogue (KPSC) UPC1; and with that postcard’s first surcharge of May 1, 1947, KPSC […]

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A Basic Introduction to the post-WWII Liberation use of Japanese Postcards in South Korea, 1946-47

Most collectors of South Korean stamps are familiar with the 1946 set of Japanese stamps overprinted for use in US-occupied South Korea and revalued in Korean currency, i.e. cheon. These are listed in the Korean Postage Stamp Catalogue (KPSC) as numbers R1-R6 and in Scott as numbers 55-60. They were issued some months after the […]

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How to determine the cost of sending a telegram in a society with two different character sets?

A problem which is very uncommon in most parts of the world is the Korean question of what to do with the fact that Koreans could use either (Korean) hangul or (Chinese) hanja characters when sending a telegram? While they can convey exactly the same message in Korean, the two writing systems are completely different […]

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The Imperfs, Double Printings and Two-Sided Printings of Korea 1946-1953 Stamps

From the first printed stamps in South Korea in 1946 after the WWII, up to around 1953, many of those issues can be found printed as imperforated stamps, double printed stamps and stamps printed on both sides. The stamps were issued by the US Military from 1946-1948. On August 15, 1948, the South Korean government […]

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