Statistic picture card showing rail, road and shipping statistics (1922)

This 1922 postcard from the Japanese colonial period in Korea is a compelling historical document, providing a glimpse into the infrastructure and logistics of the era. Specifically, it presents statistics about the transportation network in 1922. The card highlights the extensive railway system, which was approximately 1,200 Ri long, equivalent to around 373 miles or […]

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A Remarkable Foreign Postal Matter (Korea – Holland 1900)

The turn of the 20th century brought with it many marvels, not the least of which was the intricate and expansive postal system that connected even the most distant lands. Among the fascinating postal artifacts from this era is an envelope sent in the year 1900, corresponding to various calendars as Dan-Gee 4233, Kwang-Mu 4, […]

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Japanese era postcard showing statistics with a twist

The postcard presented here is a significant historical artifact that encapsulates a critical period in Korea’s history under Japanese colonial rule. The intricate design of the postcard, adorned with a traditional Korean structure and overlaid with statistical graphs, belies the grim narrative that the data represents—a narrative of a population under the strain of foreign […]

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Is this a good chance to add these dream items to your collection?

In the world of stamp collecting, the interest in historical stamps is clear, particularly those from Korea that date back to 1884. This article looks at Korea’s first issued 5 and 10 mun stamps, highlighting the controversies and questions over the authenticity of cancellations on these stamps by describing a few items from recent auctions.

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The Historic Significance of a Postal Cover from 1895

In a fascinating glimpse into the postal history of the late 19th century, a cover adorned with a unique combination of stamps provides a snapshot of the era’s postal practices. This particular cover, totaling 40 poon in postage, is comprised of stamps in denominations of 5, 10, and 25 poon. This combination precisely met the […]

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Postal stations and mapae as a means of communication before the implementation of modern postal services

Korea’s official postal system was established around 487 AD. The purpose of this system was for the central government to issue orders to local government offices. This is called the postal station system.

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Old Korean newspapers with 1900 cancellations on 1 poon surcharged stamps

The Korea post office ordered an ordinance to use 1 poon stamp for mailing newspapers in 1900. Yet there were no stamps with a 1 poon value, so the post office surcharged 1 poon on the existing 1895 Tae-Guk stamps and let them be used until the new 1 poon stamps will be published. Those […]

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A Postcard used in 1945, the last year of Japanese occupation of Korea

Forward Note by Bob Finder: The following article by one of our members of the Korea Stamp Society (KSS) shows one of the key values of being a member of the KSS; that value is the gaining of new information about Korean philately from other members. With the collaboration of six different members of the […]

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A Post Card from Korea: A Poignant Relic from Colonial Korea

(A recent listing of a postcard on Ebay led to a series of emails amongst active KSS members. James Grayson, who lived for several decades in Korea and knows a lot about the history of churches in Korea, created this text, together with Florian Eichhorn, in answer to the questions raised.) This post card forms […]

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Obtaining one more 1905 Postal Envelope of the Missionary Mr. H. G. Underwood!

This year I was lucky enough to have bid on an auction and won this 1905 postal envelope of Missionary Horace Grant Underwood. The sender’s address is “FROM: H. G. UNDERWOOD,SEOUL, KOREA.”, receiver address is typed as “Tiffin Stamp Co, 160 N St. Tiffin Ohio, USA”. The envelope was franked with a 10 cent Eagle […]

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Japanese era “directional cachets” used on New Ilhan covers leading the way to the USA

When I was writing my earlier article on New Ilhan (see KP Vol. 57 No. 1), I didn’t even realize I had more envelopes from the New Ilhan company. When I did realize, I looked around for more envelopes from New Ilhan and discovered several other items. All these envelopes must have come from the […]

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Missionary Correspondence in Colonial Korea: McCune – Hunt Letters

The three envelopes described below are small but important pieces of information about three key Presbyterian missionary families in Korea – the McCunes, the Hunts, and the Blairs. All of these families were involved in education, and became embroiled in the politics of colonial Korea under the Japanese. In particular, they and other missionaries were […]

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Early Korean fake stamps (1884 – 1895 series)

Forgeries have always been a major problem for philatelists. This is perhaps even more true for early Korean materials: the simple fact that early Korean stamps weren’t much collected before the First World War made it quite easy for stamp forgers, especially from Japan, to create forgeries which could fool collectors. Even though often very […]

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