Korean paquebot cover from 1953 shows up

In a recent series of reprinted articles several covers with Korean (Busan) paquebot cancellations from the 1950s were shown. One cover was referenced in an article by Talbert Fowler from 1954. This cover apparently came with a strange paquebot marking. The cover showed up recently in an inheritance sale of Korean paquebot covers from a […]

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“Missent to Korea” instead of paquebot from Korea

Recently I bought a cover on Ebay with a “Missent from Korea” cachet on it. Since the addressee on the envelope, Gustav Lund, was a very well-known paquebot cover collector it was immediately obvious to me that this was supposed to have been a paquebot cover. But there was no paquebot cachet on the cover. […]

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Korean Souvenir Books and Reprints issues of 1903-1906 (Part II: Reprints)

The Scott catalogue states that most of the high value Scott numbers 52-54 reprints, the 50 ch, 1 won, and 2 won, with thin, semi-transparent paper, perforation 12 ½, that are in collectors’ collections and on the market today, come from the early souvenir books. Scott values 52-4 at $400, $600, and $875, respectively; but […]

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Korean Souvenir Books and Reprints issues of 1903-1906 (Part I: Introduction)

By writing this article, this author is hoping that it will create interest and more information will be forthcoming from other readers of the Korea Stamp Society (KSS) website. The subject is known by different names. Very little literature has been published, at least in English, about, what Jim Kerr called, in his “Korean Kingdom […]

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Korean paquebot covers (1954) Part III: The captains and the Busan fires

This is the final installment of a series of articles which started with a text from Talbert B. Fowler from August 1954 as Part I and some background information to an activity started by Milbury named the Sea-Jug Post as Part II. In this part we look at Busan during the Korean War and learn […]

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Korean war 1952 Christmas card of Dutch detachment

The Dutch detachment was operational between between 1950 and 1954. It was operating under the flag of the United Nations and were under command of the United States of America. The soldiers could send there mail postage free via the American Army Post. On Arrival by airmail at Schiphol Airport Amsterdam alle cards and letters […]

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Korean paquebot covers (1954) Part II: Milbury’s Sea Jug Post

A variation of the old message-in-a-bottle that shipwrecked sailors toss to the outside world is a system devised by two American Merchant Marine Captains for sending passenger and crew mail ashore. “Via Pickle Bottle” is the rubber stamp used by Captain O.H. Martinson, master of the S.S. Mexico, and “Via Sea Jug Post” is the […]

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Australian missionary postal history shows early links with Korea

Abacus Auctions of Glen Waverley, Victoria, Australia in its auctions for 30 November to 1 December, 2019 displayed three Korean postcards for sale, two of which are pictoral cards. The pictoral postcards are of a ‘yŏt’ (Korean confection) seller and a view of a city gate in Sŏul, possibly the Great North Gate. The text […]

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Korean paquebot covers (1954) Part I: Busan and Incheon 1951-1953

Universal Postal Union regulations have for many years allowed that mail posted ON THE HIGH SEAS, and bearing stamps of the same country whose flag the vessel flies, might be put ashore at the first port of call, where it is postmarked with the paquebot marking of that port and sent on its way to […]

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Current “My own stamp” (나만의 우표) options

Currently KoreaPost offers “My own stamp” (나만의 우표) sheets with postage stamps only in the sheets, with the exception of one very large “seal” in these sheets. Three colourful examples of the possible configurations can be found on the ePost website. In these three sheets all the smaller stamps are actual postage stamps, but can […]

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New Year’s Card Denomination Error and Correction

As reported in Oo-Pyou, an error in denomination was made in the New Year’s Greeting postcard issued late last year, subsequently followed by the release of a corrected card. However, the Oo-Pyou article did not have information on the first day cancellation of these cards. As can be seen in Figure 1, the original was […]

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Caring for “Road Cats” in South Korea

Stray cats in South Korea are known as 길고양이 or “road cats” (meaning stray cats). Until very recently Koreans didn’t really keep pets; dogs were for protection and cats were use-less in general. Now everybody wants a pet, until they are no longer fun, which is when they get “released” into the street. Cats and […]

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